Features

Translating Data into Knowledge: The Data Science Initiative

Translating Data into Knowledge: The Data Science Initiative

By Ashley Serpa – Mining, organizing, interpreting, and analyzing data presents challenges for researchers of every stripe. Interdisciplinary and multifaceted, the UC Davis Data Science Initiative (DSI) is here to help.

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New Social Sciences Faculty (Part Two)

New Social Sciences Faculty (Part Two)

In the second of two features, we introduce some of the newest members of the social sciences faculty at UC Davis.

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New Social Sciences Faculty (Part One)

New Social Sciences Faculty (Part One)

Here, in the first of two features, we introduce some of the newest members of the social sciences faculty at UC Davis.

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Analyzing Arms: Brandon Kinne

Analyzing Arms: Brandon Kinne

By Griselda Jarquin and Ben Hinshaw – In the fight against domestic terrorism and other non-traditional threats, the efficacy of traditional weapons is limited. But since the end of the Cold War, global arms trading has increased. In a recent paper, Assistant Professor of Political Science Brandon Kinne traces that increase in part to a surge in bilateral defense treaties called "weapons cooperation agreements."

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Processing Language: Kenji Sagae

Processing Language: Kenji Sagae

By Alan Wong - For decades, linguists, philosophers, psychologists, anthropologists and more have explored how language "works". Today, computational linguists like Kenji Sagae are using cutting-edge techniques to ask fundamental questions about the nature of language.

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Monitoring Militarization: Erin Hamilton

Monitoring Militarization: Erin Hamilton

By Michael Haggerty – At a time when the issue of immigration is more fiercely debated than ever, how does border militarization affect migrant families? In a recent paper, Associate Professor of Sociology Erin Hamilton seeks to find out.

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Sounds, Statistics, and Software: Santiago Barreda

Sounds, Statistics, and Software: Santiago Barreda

By Alan Wong – Phonologists, psycholinguists, syntacticians: there’s more than one type of linguist. Santiago Barreda is best categorized as a phonetician, but his broader contributions to computational and quantitative methodologies give his work an interdisciplinary dimension.

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Recognizing Reconstruction: Gregory Downs

Recognizing Reconstruction: Gregory Downs

By Michael Haggerty – On January 12, 2017, President Barack Obama officially designated the first national monument recognizing the Reconstruction Era. Gregory Downs, associate professor of history at UC Davis, played an integral part in the development of that monument. Here, he explains how he came to be involved, and why he believes the project is so important.

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The Metaphysics of Mortals: Cody Gilmore

The Metaphysics of Mortals: Cody Gilmore

By Andrew McCullough – In a recent paper, Associate Professor of Philosophy Cody Gilmore distinguishes between “personal” and “external” time, exploring immortality, time travel, and the philosophy of physics in the process.

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Interacting with Intent: Nicholas A. Palomares

Interacting with Intent: Nicholas A. Palomares

By Andrew McCullough - Every social interaction is shaped by goals—our own, and those of the other people involved. As we interact, we draw inferences about the goals of others, both consciously and unconsciously. Nicholas A. Palomares, associate professor of communication, studies these inferences, including the extent to which they can influence a given goal’s “outcome success.”

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Manipulating Memory: Brian Wiltgen

Manipulating Memory: Brian Wiltgen

By Andrew McCullough - How does memory work? How do neurons in the brain allow us to remember past experiences? Understanding how the brain encodes and retrieves memories fascinates Brian Wiltgen, associate professor of psychology. Wiltgen and his colleagues use cutting-edge tools and techniques to understand how the brain remembers.

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Intergenerational Economics: Marianne Page

Intergenerational Economics: Marianne Page

By Griselda Jarquin – How do we end the cycle of poverty in the United States? How can children’s health and nutrition services reduce destitution among minors? What are the long-term benefits of safety net programs? On the eve of her Bacon Public Lectureship at UC Center Sacramento, Professor of Economics Marianne Page explains.

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Gender and Colonialism: Corrie Decker

Gender and Colonialism: Corrie Decker

By Griselda Jarquin – In colonial East Africa, young women faced intense scrutiny in their personal and professional lives. Today, in a series of connected projects, Associate Professor of History Corrie Decker investigates how those lives played out in Zanzibar, Kenya, and beyond.

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The Economics of Assimilation: Katherine Eriksson

The Economics of Assimilation: Katherine Eriksson

By Tanzeen R. Doha – Economics, migration, and labor markets: the relationship between these three fields fascinates Katherine Eriksson, assistant professor of economics. Specializing in economic history, Eriksson places particular emphasis on the early 20th century in the United States. In a recent co-authored paper, she explores how the cultural practice of naming children can affect their future placement within the labor market.

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Towards Transparency: Simine Vazire

Towards Transparency: Simine Vazire

By Phyllis Jeffrey – Why does transparency matter? As the so-called "replication crisis" places the methods, measures, and culture of science under ever-greater scrutiny, what can social scientists do to maintain faith in their research? Such questions fascinate Simine Vazire, associate professor of psychology and transparency advocate.

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Migration and Morality: Jeffrey S. Kahn

Migration and Morality: Jeffrey S. Kahn

By Tanzeen R. Doha – Jeffrey S. Kahn is an assistant professor of anthropology at UC Davis and a legal scholar interested in migration, mobility, and border policing. His research focuses on Haiti, the Guantánamo Naval Base, the United States, and the Republic of Bénin. Here, Kahn, who earned his PhD at the University of Chicago and his JD at Yale Law School, and who served as an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, talks to ISS about how he is shaping these interests into two forthcoming books.

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New Social Sciences Faculty (Part Two)

New Social Sciences Faculty (Part Two)

By Tanzeen R. Doha - In the second of two features, we introduce some of the newest members of the social sciences faculty at UC Davis.

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The Future of Climate Change: John R. Hall

The Future of Climate Change: John R. Hall

By Phyllis Jeffrey - With new physical evidence appearing every day, why does climate change remain a subject of contention, confusion—even flat-out denialism? Approaching climate change through collective orientations toward time and imaginings of the future, Research Professor of Sociology John R. Hall seeks to shed light on the sociological side of the climate change conundrum.

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New Social Sciences Faculty (Part One)

New Social Sciences Faculty (Part One)

By Phyllis Jeffrey - Here, in the first of two features, we introduce some of the newest members of the social sciences faculty at UC Davis.

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Extraordinary Responsibility: Shalini Satkunanandan

Extraordinary Responsibility: Shalini Satkunanandan

By Phyllis Jeffrey - Does “being responsible” simply mean fulfilling our duties, or paying what we owe? In her first book, Assistant Professor of Political Science Shalini Satkunanandan explores the history of calculative thinking in ethics and politics—a history with profound implications.

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Risk and Rescue: Tina Rulli

Risk and Rescue: Tina Rulli

By Rebecca Egli - If a hiker were lost in the backcountry and you were able to rescue them, would you feel morally obligated to do so? Would the hiker be similarly obliged to take adequate precautions against getting lost? In recently published research, Assistant Professor of Philosophy Tina Rulli grapples with the ethics of risk and rescue, and their implications for public policy.

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Confronting "Crimmigration": Caitlin Patler

Confronting "Crimmigration": Caitlin Patler

By Phyllis Jeffrey - Caitlin Patler’s passion for immigration research was sparked by a very particular time and place. Bringing together approaches from sociology of law, race and ethnicity, as well as literature on immigration, she channels her experiences of 1990s California into work with wide-reaching resonances.

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Ruling the Russian Frontier: Ian Campbell's Knowledge and the Ends of Empire

Ruling the Russian Frontier: Ian Campbell's Knowledge and the Ends of Empire

By Rebecca Egli - In his first book, Assistant Professor of History Ian Campbell examines how imperial Russian bureaucrats and local Kazak intermediaries worked together to produce knowledge about the strategically important but isolated Kazak steppe in the nineteenth century. Campbell’s work highlights the fundamental weakness of the Russian Empire on its borderlands, and the limits of what it could know and do.

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Crossing Boundaries: Comparative Border Studies

Crossing Boundaries: Comparative Border Studies

By Tory Brykalski - On the eve of its Winter 2016 keynote event, we look at the important, interdisciplinary work of the Mellon Initiative in Comparative Border Studies at UC Davis.

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Migrations of the Mind: David Kyle

Migrations of the Mind: David Kyle

By Loren Michael Mortimer - What does it take to leave one’s homeland in search of an uncertain future? Why do entire communities migrate to faraway lands in ways not explained by rational self-interest? Such questions have long intrigued David Kyle, associate professor of sociology and founding member of the Temporary Migration research cluster at UC Davis. In a recent paper, he offers some potential answers.

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Roosevelt and Recovery: Eric Rauchway's The Money Makers

Roosevelt and Recovery: Eric Rauchway's The Money Makers

By Loren Michael Mortimer - In his latest book, historian Eric Rauchway places Franklin Delano Roosevelt at the center of a worldwide monetary revolution. Roosevelt wanted to end the Great Depression in a way that preserved capitalism and democratic institutions. His decision to take the U.S. off the gold standard was key to the country’s economic recovery. But his monetary policy has been given scant credit—until now.

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Looking for Utopia: Smriti Srinivas

Looking for Utopia: Smriti Srinivas

By Tory Brykalski - Anthropologist Smriti Srinivas is searching for alternative futures—in the present. With today's urban spaces facing problems of waste, pollution, and uncontrolled growth, how, she asks, can we lay the foundations for humane and livable cities of tomorrow?

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Describing Colonial Art: Almerindo Ojeda

Describing Colonial Art: Almerindo Ojeda

By Loren Michael Mortimer - Since the 1950s, the study of Spanish colonial art has fallen out of favor among art historians inclined to view Colonial paintings as merely "slavish" reproductions of European originals. But Almerindo Ojeda, professor of linguistics at UC Davis and director of the Project on the Engraved Sources of Spanish Colonial Art (PESSCA), disagrees. Rejecting what he calls an "inferiority complex among colonial historians," Ojeda sees important stories embedded in colonial paintings—stories that deserve to be told.

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Separating GMO Fiction from Fact

Separating GMO Fiction from Fact

By Ben Hinshaw - The UC Global Food Initiative is committed to tackling the global food challenge, including the controversial matter of GMO crops. In a recent two-session panel entitled "GMOs: All Facts, No Fiction" held on two consecutive evenings at UC Davis and UC Riverside, the Initiative invited four experts to discuss the complexities and implications of genetically modified food. One of the panelists was Belinda Martineau, former genetic engineer and current ISS grant writer. I talked to Belinda about her background in GE food and her thoughts on what consumers deserve to know.

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Reversing the Gaze: Sunaina Maira

Reversing the Gaze: Sunaina Maira

By Tory Brykalski - The effects of the War on Terror can be felt as far afield as Pakistan and Palestine, and as close to home as on the UC Davis campus. Exploring what some of those effects might be for her forthcoming book THE 9/11 GENERATION: YOUTH, RIGHTS, AND SOLIDARITY IN THE WAR ON TERROR (NYU Press, Fall 2017), Sunaina Maira, professor of Asian American studies, enlisted the help of local Muslim American students. In the process, she found herself wondering: who exactly is social science for?

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